Slideshow 12 ways to increase employee engagement

Published
  • June 02 2015, 9:15am EDT
13 Images Total

Employee engagement is a buzz word for benefits professionals and more and more employers are looking at ways to increase engagement and enhance the company’s bottom line. According to Dale Carnegie Training, the top three drivers of employee engagement are the employee’s relationship with his or her immediate supervisor, belief in senior leadership and pride in working for the company. Hannah Morgan, author of “The Infographic Résumé” and co-author of “Social Networking for Business Success,” says answering these following 12 true-false statement questions will help pinpoint areas for growth and help increase engagement at work.


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I know what is expected of me at work.

Regular conversations between employees and managers will ensure everyone is on the same page.


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I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work properly.

If employees don’t have what they need, do they know where to look? Are your managers approachable?


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At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day.

Allow employees and managers to have discussions that allow for mutual solutions to allow the best work to be produced.


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In the past seven days, I have received recognition or praise for good work.

Engagement is a two-way street. Are employees being recognized? If not, are there ways for them to self-promote their accomplishments?


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My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.

Having an open atmosphere at work will allow information to be easily shared. Nobody is a mind reader, and open communication will only help the cause.


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There is someone at work who encourages my development.

Ensure managers are fostering development of talent. Are employees aware of provided development programs?


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At work, my opinions seem to count.

Limit the amount of blame, fault-finding and negative emotions, and focus on the facts and logic when communicating opinions.


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The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.

Is the mission message clearly stated and supported by employers? Employee engagement can only grow if a company’s vision is supported by all.


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My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work.

It’s rare, but consider opening the interview process to current employees. This provides added evaluation from people on the ground and also allows employees to assess incoming talent.


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I have a best friend at work.

Friendships are based on many things, such as common interests, mutual respect and trust. Creating a friendly atmosphere will enhance engagement. Investing time in outside activities that are mutually enjoyed can build lasting friendships.


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In the past six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.

Along with talking about development, make sure the conversation is open on current progress.


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In the past year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow.

Managers can help make this a reality by identifying specific professional development opportunities – both formal training and self-learning. When employees own professional development, more opportunities will open to help them reach set goals.


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