Slideshow Top 5 interviewer mistakes

Published
  • February 09 2016, 9:51am EST

Top 5 interviewer mistakes

A job interview is stressful, and candidates will sometimes tiptoe around answers in the hopes of not something that would remove them from the running. But employers should be cautious as well, says Fox Rothschild's Christina A. Stoneburner, a member of the firm's labor & employment practice, who notes a mistake can be made so easily during an interview that employers could lose a qualified candidate or worse, leave themselves open to legal liability. Here are 5 common mistakes she's seen interviewers make:

[Image credit: Fotolia]

Saying something discriminatory in the interview



[Image credit: Fotolia]

Content Continues Below


Saying something that could be perceived as discriminatory

Although it may sound like a regurgitation of the first question, Stoneburner says it's rare that an interviewer would say something discriminatory outright. Instead, it is comments that are made about protected classes that could be perceived as discriminatory that get interviewers in trouble.

[Image credit: Fotolia]

Being distracted or checking emails during an interview

Following the recession, hiring managers had a plethora of talent at their fingertips, and may have gotten a bit "spoiled," says Stoneburner. But as the economy has strengthened and the job market grows, job prospects have more to choose from and interviewers must sell the applicant on working for the company.

[Image credit: Fotolia]

Promising anything

Until a final decision is made as to who is going to be hired and at what salary, no promises should be made that the candidate is going to get the job or that a particular salary or benefit will be offered, she says.

[Image credit: Fotolia]

Content Continues Below


Being negative about HR

Comments like "I'd hire you now myself, but I still have to get HR to sign off," may leave a negative impression of the company with applicatnts. "Human resources is responsible for addressing employee relations issues in the workplace, including complaints of harassment and discrimination," Stoneburner notes. Comments like these make HR seem ineffective and unnecessary, which could plant a seed in an applicant's head that HR is not the place to go to resolve disputes.

[Image credit: Fotolia]