There’s no sense in denying it: Since its launch in 2004, Facebook’s effect on the Internet, the way we share and receive information, and the way we interact with one another has been profound and irreversible.

I remember getting smacked with this reality once, as I updated my Facebook status while sitting in a movie theater waiting for “The Social Network” to start, and again as I watched a cable news report that invited viewers to share their thoughts on the upcoming Facebook IPO on the network’s Facebook page.

Billionaire boy wonder Mark Zuckerberg has truly revolutionized the interwebs, and so when Morningstar reported this week that some 50 mutual funds have shares in Facebook, standing to gain billions, I think it’s only fair to wonder: Can Zuckerberg revolutionize retirement as well?

Not directly, no. Obviously, baby boomers won’t retire in snug security by the millions once the Facebook IPO becomes official. Still, the ripple effects might be hard to ignore. 

According to reporting by EBN’s sister publication Money Management Executive, among the largest holders are T. Rowe Price, Fidelity Investments and Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley also is the lead underwriter in the offering, which is expected to raise at least $5 billion and possibly as much as $10 billion.

Morgan Stanley “may see the biggest boost among the three because Facebook shares in its funds constitute the largest percentage of assets among the 50 offerings, around 3% or so,” Morningstar reports.

Not too shabby. Ready to add Morgan Stanley to your list of retirement plan offerings based on its Facebook ties? Will the list overall have any measurable effect on retirement plan investors? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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