Slideshow 5 employee appreciation mistakes to avoid

Published
  • December 24 2015, 9:30am EST
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As the year comes to a close among the rush of holiday events, it’s important to reflect on employees’ contributions and to show a genuine appreciation for their hard work throughout the year. The nonprofit organization Recognition Professionals International offers five things HR and benefit managers should avoid doing when appreciating their staff.


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No more texting ‘thanks’

Managers and leaders need to go the extra mile beyond a text or email. Ditch the technology and grab a pen, paper and handwrite a note to show your appreciation. RPI advises managers to not solely rely on the “company gift” and go above and beyond to add a personal touch.


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No more shout-outs and backslaps

Along with a personal thank you to the employee, it’s important this time of year to also remember the employees’ support back home. For all the late nights and additional work trips, let his or her family members know your appreciation.


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No more self-serve

When it comes to the office party or potluck, make sure leaders are visibly involved in the organization and clean-up. When employees see supervisors doing some of the “heavy lifting,” it sends a clearer message that everyone is part of the team.


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No more generic gifts

Make sure the holiday gifts have an impact, RPI says, especially when individual gifts aren’t practical. “Think of things that will make employees’ working-lives a little better or a little easier [such as] a new espresso machine for the department, faster WiFi, a new TV for the break room,” RPI says. In the end, the message managers should want to send is “you count and we want to make your workplace a positive environment for all of the hours you are here.”


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No more quiet acknowledgements or public embarrassment

Know your employee, and take time to learn what makes him or her tick. While some revel in cheers from their teams, others will always prefer a private, personal thank-you. Do your homework, RPI says, and do your best to learn their personalities and what type of acknowledgement will be memorable to them.


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