Our daily roundup of retirement news your clients may be thinking about.

Lottery winnings' impact on Social Security
Lottery winnings of retirees will not result in a lower retirement benefit, as the windfall will not be subject to the earnings test, according to this Q-and-A article on Kiplinger. However, they can expect an increase in their Medicare Part B premiums as a result.


How tech can make retirement harder for couples
A retired couple can have a serious misunderstanding because of technology, writes an expert on Forbes. This is especially true if one of them is not tech-savvy and will ask the more proficient spouse for help on how to use a new device or app, writes the expert. "In addition, there were a few times when the less technologically proficient spouse messed up the computer and the computer-savvy partner had to fix it. As a result, resentment started to build and became a huge source of frustration and disappointment to both of them."

It’s high time Gen X takes retirement seriously
Many Gen Xers do not have enough retirement savings even as they approach their peak earning years, writes an expert on CNBC. "Gen Xers' confidence in their ability to manage their own finances may be impeding their chances of reaching a fully secure retirement. Gen X needs to set a vision for retirement and develop a plan for realizing it," writes the expert. "They also must recognize that an advisor's expertise can be critical in keeping investors on track and helping them reach their goals."

How has the bucket strategy performed?
A portfolio simulation shows that the Model Bucket portfolios performed well from 2000 to 2017 thanks to a strong equity market, writes Morningstar's Christine Benz. While the portfolios had a cash component, they could have performed better if they were entirely invested in stocks and bonds, writes the expert. "Yet the cash holdings in the Bucket Portfolios have no doubt provided a valuable intangible to retirees who employ the system: peace of mind."

5 ways to lower health care costs in the U.S.
The rising cost of health care is likely to continue in the foreseeable future, and experts at a summit said that this should not be the case, according to this article on MarketWatch. To help retirees minimize their medical expenses, they should be given more information about the health services and products they need, as well as more and better options. The number of medical tests for patients should be reduced, and greater competition among health care providers should be encouraged. “There is growing consensus to allow Medicare, the largest purchaser of prescription drugs, to negotiate on price. This will help bring prices down tremendously,” says an expert.

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